Water & Drought

These parts of SLO County are out of severe drought thanks to a 'Minor Miracle March'

San Luis Creek roars through downtown SLO

Spectators gathered to watch as San Luis Creek roars near Mission Plaza in downtown San Luis Obispo as a major March rainstorm forced water levels up on Thursday, March 22, 2018.
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Spectators gathered to watch as San Luis Creek roars near Mission Plaza in downtown San Luis Obispo as a major March rainstorm forced water levels up on Thursday, March 22, 2018.

The "Minor Miracle March" storms that hit San Luis Obispo County last week lifted a sizeable chunk of the county out of severe drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

The wet weather left most areas of the county with 2 to 5 inches of rain and added substantial water to the region's reservoirs for the first time during a very dry rainy season.

Severe drought conditions crept into the Central Coast and Southern California after a particularly rainless February.

Just two weeks ago, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties were all experiencing severe drought. A portion of Ventura County was even experiencing extreme drought.

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Although drought conditions remain, portions of all four counties have received enough much-needed rain to alleviate the previously dire situation.

The storms brought enough water to downgrade a portion of San Luis Obispo County from severe drought status to moderate drought status, according to a U.S. Drought Monitor map released on Thursday.

A small section in the northwest corner of the region is not experiencing drought conditions and is classified as being abnormally dry.

Rain scenes from Morro Bay and Avila Beach in San Luis Obispo County, on March 22, 2018.

Lindsey Holden: 805-781-7939, @lindseymholden

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