Tourists taste samples of Rotta wine in the 7,000-gallon tasting room. The room is a rebuilt wine cask, complete with a pale pink crust of cream of tartar on the ceiling — the remains of the last time the cask was used for wine. Tartar has to be scraped from wine casks each time they are emptied. Mrs. Romilda Rotta, center, supervises the sampling.
Tourists taste samples of Rotta wine in the 7,000-gallon tasting room. The room is a rebuilt wine cask, complete with a pale pink crust of cream of tartar on the ceiling — the remains of the last time the cask was used for wine. Tartar has to be scraped from wine casks each time they are emptied. Mrs. Romilda Rotta, center, supervises the sampling. Larry Jamison Telegram-Tribune
Tourists taste samples of Rotta wine in the 7,000-gallon tasting room. The room is a rebuilt wine cask, complete with a pale pink crust of cream of tartar on the ceiling — the remains of the last time the cask was used for wine. Tartar has to be scraped from wine casks each time they are emptied. Mrs. Romilda Rotta, center, supervises the sampling. Larry Jamison Telegram-Tribune

When SLO County wine was known for redwood casks and screw tops

October 07, 2016 02:56 PM

About Photos From the Vault

David Middlecamp

@davidmiddlecamp

Photographer David Middlecamp has been delving into The Tribune's archives to share historical photos and articles about the Central Coast with readers since 2007. Reach him at dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com .