Letters to the Editor

Why the U.S. is the only civilized country without universal health care

In this July 13, 2017 photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans’ latest health care plan would create winners and losers among Americans up and down the income ladder, and across age groups.
In this July 13, 2017 photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans’ latest health care plan would create winners and losers among Americans up and down the income ladder, and across age groups. AP

Regarding Ed Bogusch’s recent letter to the editor (“Baby boomer wonders what it’s like being a liberal Democrat,” June 29):

There’s a family with three children and one is stricken with a crippling disease. Would they deny proper care to it because it would cost more than the others? I doubt it. Rather, they would do everything possible to help this child have a normal life. It would unite the family, as they would grow strong and thrive together No matter what happened, they would know they did the best as a whole for the family.

I know this may be difficult for you, but try to think of this nation as a family striving to advance by looking out for each other. The haves are not really hurting, but some of the have nots are having a hard time and need help. By creating a universal health care plan everyone benefits and we have a better place to live.

We are about the only civilized nation in the world that does not provide universal health care. So you can’t say it doesn’t work. What is stopping us from doing this? Let me give you a hint … it’s not the baby boomer liberals.

Jim Conroy, Los Osos

  Comments