Letters to the Editor

Snowflakes are not so weak after all

Peyton Price, 14, from La Plata, Md., left, tries to make her point to another person who disagrees with her, during a rally to support President Donald Trump, Saturday, June 3, 2017, in Washington.
Peyton Price, 14, from La Plata, Md., left, tries to make her point to another person who disagrees with her, during a rally to support President Donald Trump, Saturday, June 3, 2017, in Washington. AP

My recent letter to the Tribune, extolling the virtues of the Muslim meet-and-greet in San Luis Obispo, elicited several posted responses. While some agreed with me, others felt I was “stupid,” “ignorant,” “naive,” “misguided” and “deceived” — to name a few. And more than one called me a snowflake. A snowflake!

The term snowflake seems to have ascended to the epithet of choice used by Trumpsters, presumably signifying someone so weak and fragile that we melt away with the slightest adversity. May I respectfully, using my limited intelligence, remind snowflake-callers of the following facts?

With the passage of time, a group of snowflakes lodged into the cracks of a mountain of granite can — more powerfully than dynamite — split that immovable rock into pieces. Likewise, snowflake upon snowflake, lumped and frozen together into a glacier, can scoop out mighty valleys such as our own Yosemite.

Maybe a snowflake is not so weak after all. Just sayin’.

So to those of you thought you were ridiculing me with your snowflake label: Thank you — I accept the compliment. Now wish me luck. I am leaving soon for the third year in a row to provide medical care for Syrian refugees in the Middle East, and am hoping I won’t melt in the desert sun.

Steven Sainsbury, San Luis Obispo

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