Letters to the Editor

Coming to the sad realization about our new ‘anti-fact’ society

People hold signs as they listen to a group of scientists speak during a rally in conjunction with the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, in San Francisco. The rally was to call attention to what scientist believe is unwarranted attacks by the incoming Trump administration against scientists advocating for the issue of climate change and its impact.
People hold signs as they listen to a group of scientists speak during a rally in conjunction with the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, in San Francisco. The rally was to call attention to what scientist believe is unwarranted attacks by the incoming Trump administration against scientists advocating for the issue of climate change and its impact. The Associated Press

I have to admit I’ve been suffering under an unnamed funk since the election. At first, I thought I might blame it on the election itself. Watching our country elect an elitist billionaire businessman with no political experience to represent lower middle-class white workers was such a disconnect that I thought maybe that’s what had me feeling down.

Then I saw a letter in your Dec. 28 issue (“Sick and tired of the arrogant left”).

Before the election, I liked to fool myself and think that the climate change deniers and the “if I believe it personally, then it’s true” crowd were a small minority in the U.S.

The author helped me realize that the reason this election has me feeling so low is that it now appears this “anti-science/anti-fact” (can I say “anti-reality”?) group is much larger than anyone expected.

Who knew there was such a large mass of Americans that can’t be bothered with facts?

So that’s what’s got me down. I just didn’t grasp that we’ve reached a point where critical thinking will be a minority attribute.

Thomas Bringle, Grover Beach

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