Twin Falls High School (Idaho) science teachers Ashley Moretti, left, and Candace Wright, right, use their eclipse shades to look at the sun as they pose for a portrait. The district bought 11,000 pairs of solar glasses, enough for every student and staff member to view the solar eclipse Aug. 21, from Twin Falls.
Twin Falls High School (Idaho) science teachers Ashley Moretti, left, and Candace Wright, right, use their eclipse shades to look at the sun as they pose for a portrait. The district bought 11,000 pairs of solar glasses, enough for every student and staff member to view the solar eclipse Aug. 21, from Twin Falls. Pat Sutphin The Associated Press
Twin Falls High School (Idaho) science teachers Ashley Moretti, left, and Candace Wright, right, use their eclipse shades to look at the sun as they pose for a portrait. The district bought 11,000 pairs of solar glasses, enough for every student and staff member to view the solar eclipse Aug. 21, from Twin Falls. Pat Sutphin The Associated Press

Excited for the total solar eclipse? Better get eye protection, and here’s why

July 29, 2017 02:29 PM

About Weather Watch

John Lindsey

@PGE_John

John Lindsey writes Weather Watch, a weekly column for The Tribune. He is PG&E's Diablo Canyon meteorologist and media relations representative. Email him at pgeweather@pge.com .