An undated file photo released by the Rocky Intertidal Lab at the UC Santa Cruz shows a sea star suffering from wasting syndrome — it’s missing one arm and has tissue damage to another. The affliction causes white lesions to develop, which can spread and turn the animals into “goo.” It has killed up to 95 percent of a particular species of sea star in some tide pool populations.
An undated file photo released by the Rocky Intertidal Lab at the UC Santa Cruz shows a sea star suffering from wasting syndrome — it’s missing one arm and has tissue damage to another. The affliction causes white lesions to develop, which can spread and turn the animals into “goo.” It has killed up to 95 percent of a particular species of sea star in some tide pool populations. Laura Anderson AP/Rocky Intertidal Lab UC Santa Cruz
An undated file photo released by the Rocky Intertidal Lab at the UC Santa Cruz shows a sea star suffering from wasting syndrome — it’s missing one arm and has tissue damage to another. The affliction causes white lesions to develop, which can spread and turn the animals into “goo.” It has killed up to 95 percent of a particular species of sea star in some tide pool populations. Laura Anderson AP/Rocky Intertidal Lab UC Santa Cruz

Ochre sea stars have suffered a 95 percent die-off in SLO County

February 15, 2016 04:19 PM