Letters to the Editor

It’s time for California to permanently end daylight saving time

Tom Liberatore, a materials purchasing manager, walks past clocks being tested prior to shipping at the Electric Time Company in Medfield, Mass., on March 10, 2016. Most Americans lose an hour of sleep, but gain an hour of evening light during daylight saving time.
Tom Liberatore, a materials purchasing manager, walks past clocks being tested prior to shipping at the Electric Time Company in Medfield, Mass., on March 10, 2016. Most Americans lose an hour of sleep, but gain an hour of evening light during daylight saving time. Associated Press

It was encouraging to read a story written by Jeremy B. White of The Sacramento Bee that Assembly Bill 385 is headed to the Senate floor and if passed, voters will be asked to vote on the bill that would end daylight saving time.

Since the concept of daylight saving time was implemented in 1918 — close to 100 years ago — we now have automobiles, air conditioning and a thinner ozone layer than we had in 1918.

When daylight saving takes effect, we are told there is evidence that the severity of auto accidents increases, both parents and children get less sleep and people with sleep disorders find the transition more difficult.

Study after study has concluded that daylight saving time has not only failed to limit energy consumption, but is causing people to use more electricity.

Hawaii is one of two states that do not follow daylight saving because of its proximity to the equator.

If you have ever been to Arizona in the summer, you can understand why it does not need an extra hour of daylight.

If the voters of California support the bill to end daylight saving, then we can expect Las Vegas and the rest of the Southwest to follow.

Mark Kramer, Cambria

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