Letters to the Editor

Trump’s brashness and outbursts are why he shouldn’t be president

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Friday in Altoona, Pa.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Friday in Altoona, Pa. AP

“What supporters see in Trump” by Al Fonzi (Aug. 7) is another Republican sellout attempt to defend the indefensible: Trump’s presidential qualifications.

Mr. Fonzi claims Trump’s “brash, often coarse,” New York-style, never-apologize discourse endears Trump. Trump’s rude, vitriolic, hateful remarks incite racial division, rage and fear. His inability to control these outbursts makes him unfit for the Oval Office.

Americans are “cynical about the political process” and “elected officials,” asserts Mr. Fonzi. Ironically, Trump exemplifies how the very rich and corporate America have used their wealth to influence politics to their advantage, leading to huge wealth and income disparities that cause Americans cynicism. (Think Citizen’s United and deregulation of Wall Street.) Trump’s economic speech advocates more of the same; tax breaks for the wealthy and trickle-down economics.

Mr. Fonzi praised Trump’s business acumen but failed to mention how he took advantage of pro-business tax and bankruptcy laws, reneged on debts and cheated his workers.

Trump’s crazy advocation of torture, admiration of Vladimir Putin and willingness to drop the atomic bomb are a few of his dangerous foreign policy ideas.

I admire those Republicans who put our country first over party and refuse to support this unqualified, dangerous candidate.

Beryl Bennett, Morro Bay

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