Letters to the Editor

Would party loyalty matter if Clinton and Trump’s affiliations were reversed?

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, waves after speaking to the National Association of Home Builders on Aug. 11 in Miami Beach, Fla. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, gives a speech on the economy after touring Futuramic Tool & Engineering on Aug. 11 in Warren, Mich.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, waves after speaking to the National Association of Home Builders on Aug. 11 in Miami Beach, Fla. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, gives a speech on the economy after touring Futuramic Tool & Engineering on Aug. 11 in Warren, Mich. Associated Press

I grew up in a very strong Republican household. My parents held the polls in their garage and only had Republican friends.

In 1996, I was practically disowned for mentioning to them that I was thinking of voting for Bill Clinton. I told them I really didn’t consider myself a Democrat or a Republican, and I just wanted to vote for the candidate I felt would best serve our country, our children and the future. That was the end of the discussion, and I never spoke politics with my father again.

My father is gone now, and last week I asked my 87-year-old mother who she was voting for. She said, “Trump.” I asked her why, and she said, “Well, I don’t like him, but he’s the Republican candidate.”

I was speechless and thought to myself, “How many other people, Republican or Democrat, feel that same way, that unspoken sense of loyalty to their party, no matter who is running?”

So, I’m asking — be honest with yourselves — let’s imagine for one moment that Donald Trump is the Democratic Party’s candidate and Hillary Clinton is the Republican Party’s candidate for president. Who would you vote for?

Diane Stockwell, Templeton

  Comments