Letters to the Editor

Black people are at risk of being shot by police for their skin color

Health care professional Charles Kinsey, shot by a North Miami police officer on July 18 while trying to protect an autistic patient, made his first public appearance July 28 in Aventura, Fla.
Health care professional Charles Kinsey, shot by a North Miami police officer on July 18 while trying to protect an autistic patient, made his first public appearance July 28 in Aventura, Fla. Miami Herald/TNS

I noted with sadness the unsettling comments of Helen Saulsbury in her July 24 letter, “If you're not committing a crime, you won't get shot by police.” Oh how I wish that were true.

To be fair, Ms. Saulsbury laments the deadly ambushing of police officers, a sentiment with which I agree.

She goes on to write: “One thing is for sure, if you’re not committing a crime — no matter what your skin color is — you have no chance of getting shot by law enforcement.”

Yet, consider another recent shooting event that disproves her claim:

Charles Kinsey was on his back and unarmed, holding his hands in the air, yelling, “don’t shoot.”

But North Miami Officer Jonathan Aledda shot the 47-year-old behavioral therapist who was helping an autistic patient anyway.

When Kinsey asked why he’d been shot in the leg, the officer replied, “I don’t know.”

Friends, this is despicable.

As a white person, I see that our country has problems that cannot be solved with guns. We need police with excellent training, for one.

It’s yet another example of what black people already know: All you have to do to be considered a threat is be black.

Rebecca Townsend, San Luis Obispo

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