Letters to the Editor

Demand action on climate issues from candidates during the election

Amiya Brunet, 3, sits on the bridge that leads to her home that frequently floods in Isle de Jean Charles, La., on April 7, 2016. A $48 million grant for Isle de Jean Charles is the first allocation of federal tax dollars to move an entire community struggling with the effects of climate change.
Amiya Brunet, 3, sits on the bridge that leads to her home that frequently floods in Isle de Jean Charles, La., on April 7, 2016. A $48 million grant for Isle de Jean Charles is the first allocation of federal tax dollars to move an entire community struggling with the effects of climate change. The New York Times

With national elections only a few months away, citizens can anticipate being bombarded with ads highlighting candidates’ negative qualities.

During these months of focus, we can choose to be more than mere campaign rhetoric receptacles. Utilizing our democratic process to demand answers to critical issues facing us will engender empowerment and action.

At the top of the list of topics we should address with candidates is climate change, an issue affecting us, our children and grandchildren, and indeed all of Earth’s inhabitants.

This year, 2016, promises to be the hottest year on record. While arctic sea ice melts, sea levels rise and temperatures soar to unlivable levels around the globe, the U.S. Democratic platform is conspicuously absent a statement on climate change and Republicans continue their pernicious climate denial.

As voters, we can choose to shift from silent recipients to vocal participants by becoming involved in the election process. Question the candidates on their solutions to climate change and how they intend to ensure a livable planet going forward.

Contact Citizens’ Climate Lobby at www.citizensclimatelobby.org and become one of thousands of ordinary citizens who are creating the political will to enact climate solutions.

Sandy Simon, San Luis Obispo

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