Letters to the Editor

With climate change, it’s too late for us to stop our extinction

Climate activists demonstrate in Paris, Saturday, Dec.12, 2015 during the COP21, the United Nations Climate Change Conference. Several environmental and human rights groups were planning protests around Paris to call attention to populations threatened by man-made global warming and urge an end to human use of oil, gas and coal.
Climate activists demonstrate in Paris, Saturday, Dec.12, 2015 during the COP21, the United Nations Climate Change Conference. Several environmental and human rights groups were planning protests around Paris to call attention to populations threatened by man-made global warming and urge an end to human use of oil, gas and coal. Associated Press

When growing up, I was always aware of global warming, but it wasn’t until recently that I fully realized its extent and consequences. During an assignment in my freshman English class, I came to the alarming conclusion that it is too late for us to stop the extinction of the human species.

My first step was to analyze the extent of current global warming and the scientific forecasts for greenhouse gas emissions. According to a recent peer-reviewed journal by Harvard research students, in the past 12 years methane emissions in the U.S. have risen by a staggering 30 percent, contributing to the 60 percent increase of methane in the atmosphere (Turner).

The increase in greenhouse gas is alarming, but what makes it worse are our current presidential candidates. It doesn’t matter whom you vote for this November; it isn’t looking good. Hillary Clinton presents a weak plan, and is backed by big oil and gas money. As bad as that sounds, Donald Trump is even worse; he fails to even acknowledge that global warming exists. The sad truth is that the next president will be the most crucial in the race to stop global warming, but both candidates lack potential.

Liam Dunn, San Luis Obispo

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