Letters to the Editor

Chumash marine sanctuary would protect the ocean’s health

Lois Capps gave a speech on the proposed marine sanctuary at the foot of the Pismo Pier, and here introduces San Luis Obispo Mayor Jan Marx. Behind them are Matiwaiya Ceremonial Elder with Wishtoyo Chumash Foundation and Luhui Ishi Cultural Resources and Education Director with the same organization.
Lois Capps gave a speech on the proposed marine sanctuary at the foot of the Pismo Pier, and here introduces San Luis Obispo Mayor Jan Marx. Behind them are Matiwaiya Ceremonial Elder with Wishtoyo Chumash Foundation and Luhui Ishi Cultural Resources and Education Director with the same organization. dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com

I’m writing on behalf of Yak Tityu Tityu Northern Chumash Tribe, whose membership is composed of families with ancestries dating back to the region of San Luis Obispo County for well over 10,000 years. We’re not affiliated with any other tribe or council. Many of us have an unbroken chain of residency in this region, and we understand the importance of yak spasini (Northern Chumash words for “the ocean”).

As indigenous people from this area, we are in favor of the Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary designation. We feel it adds protection and provides for the health of yak spasini that is home to a vast and not completely understood ecosystem. In addition, the well-being of yak spasini is irrevocably connected to the well-being of all people.

We hope the designation is soon granted, and we respectfully encourage others to express their support of the sanctuary.

Mona Olivas Tucker, chairwoman of the Yak Tityu Tityu tribe, Arroyo Grande

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