Letters to the Editor

Golfers should pay to keep their course green

Tanny Koeppel, Louise McCoy and Mary Pollock, (from left) on the 11th green at Dairy Creek May 16. The golf course is seeing less water delivered from treatment plant as the inmate count at CMC and water conservation measures at the prison take effect. Greens get water but other areas much less.
Tanny Koeppel, Louise McCoy and Mary Pollock, (from left) on the 11th green at Dairy Creek May 16. The golf course is seeing less water delivered from treatment plant as the inmate count at CMC and water conservation measures at the prison take effect. Greens get water but other areas much less. dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com

Why should taxpayers subsidize the $500,000 deficit for the Dairy Creek Golf Course (“Dairy Creek Golf Course running out of money and water,” May 17) just because “the golf course has a shortfall of 142 acre-feet of water, which is causing the course to turn brown and prompting complaints from golfers of poor golfing conditions”?

Supervisor Bruce Gibson said: “This board is going to have to step up.”

I think the ones who are going to have to step up are the players who use the course. Increasing the green fees wasn’t mentioned among the various options to cover the cost for maintaining the course. Why not? If, as Gibson said, “golf teaches us a set of values and offers an athletic opportunity,” then golfers should be willing to pay for their entertainment and exercise in beautiful settings like the three county owned courses they have available to them.

Chuck Dowdle, Cambria

  Comments