Letters to the Editor

No-party voters can still cast ballot in primaries

Poll worker Ray Black hands out stickers to voters at Hanover's Ward 3 polling station April 26 at the Utz Pavillion in Hanover, Pa.
Poll worker Ray Black hands out stickers to voters at Hanover's Ward 3 polling station April 26 at the Utz Pavillion in Hanover, Pa. Associated Press

If you are registered to vote and have a party affiliation (Democrat, Republican, Libertarian), you will receive a primary ballot with the nominees from the party you listed.

If you were or currently are a voter with “no party preference” (NPP) — previously “decline to state” — you should check with the San Luis Obispo County Clerk-Recorder’s Office (805-781-5228) before May 23. NPP voters, unless they choose otherwise, will receive a nonpartisan ballot that does not include presidential candidates. Upon request, an NPP voter can vote on the presidential ballot for the following parties: American Independent, Democratic and Libertarian.

Also, if you are registered as an American Independent, Democrat or Libertarian and want to cross over and vote for a Republican, Green or Peace and Freedom party candidate, you will have to re-register for that party before May 23. Online voter registration can be completed at www.registertovote.ca.gov.

The “closed primary” system of California was amended by Proposition 198. The Supreme Court overturned the proposition, and California modified it for presidential elections, allowing NPP voters to participate in a primary election if authorized by an individual’s party rules and duly noted by the secretary of state.

The “top-two” open primary act applies to candidates running for county central committees or local offices only.

Former Mayor A.K. Pete Dougall, Arroyo Grande

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