Letters to the Editor

Poaching continues to damage the world’s exotic animal population

Tourists watch a one-horned rhinoceros inside the Kaziranga national park in India.
Tourists watch a one-horned rhinoceros inside the Kaziranga national park in India. Associated Press file photo

My friend and I recently have embarked on a project studying the poaching of exotic animals.

We have discovered that animals such as elephants, rhinos and pandas have become endangered because of illegal poaching.

This poaching is damaging the environment and preventing the future existence of many beloved animals across the world. The rhino population has decreased greatly in the past 100 years. If the rhino population continues to decrease, it is predicted that rhinos may go extinct by 2020.

The issue of poaching has not been acknowledged enough in the world, and it will continue to persist until action is taken upon it.

Donald Trump supported his sons’ killing of exotic animals in their trip to Africa. If world leaders are contributing to the problem, it will only become worse. Most of you reading this may find this to be a small issue in the grand scheme of things. However, problems with the environment can be connected to the issue of poaching.

Now, picture your grandchildren being told about these amazing creatures, such as rhinos or elephants, but thinking of them as if they were dinosaurs. In the near future, that is what they will be.

Aidan Callarman and Colton Campa, San Luis Obispo

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