Letters to the Editor

Entering college rape culture is a terrifying prospect

A woman reported being sexually assaulted March 31 at a Delta Chi fraternity party held at an off-campus residence affiliated with the fraternity. Another alleged attempted sexual assault took place at the fraternity chapter house, seen here, on March 6.
A woman reported being sexually assaulted March 31 at a Delta Chi fraternity party held at an off-campus residence affiliated with the fraternity. Another alleged attempted sexual assault took place at the fraternity chapter house, seen here, on March 6. jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

Thank you for your article on sexual assault (“Cal Poly fraternity suspended after second reported sexual assault,” April 5).

As a person very close to the issue of sexual abuse, I wouldn’t want such profound trauma to happen to anyone else. It’s important to protect those incapable of protecting themselves, even if they were intoxicated.

I have heard that sororities do not have access to alcohol but fraternities do; it’s a recipe for rape. One in four college women experience sexual assault. I’m going to college soon, and I don’t want to feel unsafe on my own campus. And if it happens on one campus, it can happen on others.

Colleges need to set up more protective rules to help young women. Cal Poly needs to release any records of any assault instead of trying to protect its “good name.” Any crime untold will hurt the victim more and take away their chances of getting help.

Young men need to actually be charged for their crime, be punished for what they did and take responsibility for their actions. Not only have they broken the law, but they have broken someone’s sense of security forever.

Julissa Rendon, Paso Robles

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