Letters to the Editor

‘Laws of economics’ just protect the rich

Union workers support Gov. Jerry Brown signing a bill creating the highest statewide minimum wage at $15 an hour by 2022 at the Ronald Reagan building in Los Angeles on April 4. California and New York both acted early April to gradually push their statewide minimum wages to $15 an hour, the highest level in the nation.
Union workers support Gov. Jerry Brown signing a bill creating the highest statewide minimum wage at $15 an hour by 2022 at the Ronald Reagan building in Los Angeles on April 4. California and New York both acted early April to gradually push their statewide minimum wages to $15 an hour, the highest level in the nation. Associated Press

Martin Hawke (“Raising minimum wage always has ripple effect,” April 7) is wrong on every count regarding minimum wage increases.

First, there are no “laws of economics.” This old adage helps hide the fact that the wealthiest people in the world exert enormous influence on economic systems by manipulating money flow and controlling economic policy through their bought legislators. For more than 40 years, the wealthy class has effectively kept jobs low-paying and with few protections or benefits.

Second, years of research shows that local economies improve after minimum wage increases are implemented. Generally, more spending power is given to workers, which in turn fuels more spending, which means more hiring, etc. It is the working class that creates jobs, not the wealthy class.

What workers need to do is join together through labor unions and use their power to demand a full package of much-needed economic reforms, including implementing a living wage standard, a single-payer health care system, paid leaves and vacations, full retirement benefits and more. The wealthiest of our citizens already enjoy these at the expense of the rest of us. We are overdue in reclaiming them for ourselves.

Mark Tomes, Santa Margarita

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