Letters to the Editor

Fighting carbon ... with carbon

Kayakers, boaters and more came together in an attempt to form a peace sign on the water at the Baywood Climate Fest on Nov. 29, 2015. The event is part of a global movement calling for climate justice and an end to carbon pollution.
Kayakers, boaters and more came together in an attempt to form a peace sign on the water at the Baywood Climate Fest on Nov. 29, 2015. The event is part of a global movement calling for climate justice and an end to carbon pollution. Courtesy Instagram: @SanLuisObispo

I read with interest about the 200 concerned folks who came together in Baywood on Sunday to raise awareness, call for climate justice and put an end to carbon pollution (“Boaters, kayakers urge action on climate change,” The Tribune, Nov. 30.)

They brought together their colorful kayaks, canoes and paddleboards to form a giant and beautiful floating peace sign.

What I find most fascinating is the probable weight and material construction of this magnificent peace sign.

Most paddleboards are constructed with nondegradable materials like polystyrene/Styrofoam, fiberglass, resin and epoxy, along with various adhesives and paints. A majority of kayaks are produced with molded plastics, made from hydrocarbon gas liquids. All transported to a massive number of retail outlets by carbon-producing container ships, trains and diesel trucks.

And what do you think this most aware and concerned group of rubber-clad, climate-change activists would use to move this 1 ton, carbon-hating “peace sign” into its fantastic floating shape?

The ever essential … carbon fiber paddle.

Peace, man!

Andy Murphy, Arroyo Grande

  Comments