Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor: Readers say Cal Poly Chick-fil-A decision right and just, downtown SLO bad for health

The decision of the Cal Poly powers on Chick-fil-A is right and just, and it represents the majority of the students, say G. Sundano of Arroyo Grande. Here incoming Cal Poly students crowd onto the field at the Lower Sports Complex in 2013 to take part in the WOW-A-Rama festivities.
The decision of the Cal Poly powers on Chick-fil-A is right and just, and it represents the majority of the students, say G. Sundano of Arroyo Grande. Here incoming Cal Poly students crowd onto the field at the Lower Sports Complex in 2013 to take part in the WOW-A-Rama festivities. dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com

Yay for Chick-fil-A being let alone at Cal Poly.

Our society is too much ordered by small agenda groups like the LGBT, who pretend to “represent” the interests of all the students at Cal Poly, which they don’t!

Freedom of speech should not be determined by those who want to censor those who give any alternative opinion of other people’s lives, without being provocative or hateful.

The decision of the Cal Poly powers is right and just, and it does represent the majority of the students, I believe.

G. Sudano, Arroyo Grande

Why so many shootings?

Another day, another school shooting. When is someone going to ask the question: “Why are our kids doing this to one another?”

What has happened in the past 20 plus years that is causing our children to feel violence is the answer to their troubles?

How about some input from all the therapists and child psychologists out there? There has to be a reason why this behavior has become so common. Why can’t someone figure this out?   

Steve Himmelrich, San Luis Obispo

Downtown SLO is bad for my health

I used to often go downtown, enjoying the quaintness of the streets, looking for clothes and stopping at Linnea’s Cafe or Big Sky.

I now avoid it because I know I will be angry for days afterward. I park in one of the garages on Palm Street, and the first thing I see is a monstrous new hotel that makes the nearby garages look like elegant dwellings in comparison. As I walk as fast as I can away from this nightmare and find refuge on Higuera Street, I glance at what used to be Garden Street, and has become SUV Gardenless Street, so now it’s too painful to go to Linnea’s.

Then comes Big Sky, and I can't avoid seeing the stack of boxes they have dumped behind the small and still charming buildings of Marsh Street. By then my blood pressure has reached 140! I know that many residents, like me, also ask what this disfigurement of our city can accomplish.

You don’t find affordable housing in a hotel where the rooms are $400 a night, or in an apartment building where the rent is sky high. Is there still time to stop this recklessness and save what remains? 

How about some input from all the therapists and child psychologists out there? There has to be a reason why this behavior has become so common. Why can't someone figure this out?

Odile Ayral, San Luis Obispo   

Lack of facts ‘appalling’

I want you to know how refreshing it was to read the letter in your opinion section written by Russ Surber regarding The Tribune’s refusal to acknowledge the fact that after an exhaustive, two-year investigation, the report by Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller found no evidence President Trump colluded with the Russian Government. Yet The Tribune ignores the facts and posts cartoons implying the opposite.

In addition, the reference to Daniel Patrick Moynihan and his observation that, “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts,” is absolutely correct. The lack of factual reporting by our media these days is appalling.

John Texeira, Paso Robles

Cal Poly logo

Those who follow The Trib news online are all abuzz and offended over the Cal Poly logo because it reminds them of the Soviet Union’s hammer and sickle. I wonder if these same people care about the fact that after Donald Trump’s friendly phone call last week, Vladimir Putin likely knows what is in the redacted portions of the Mueller report, but American citizens do not.

Do they care that Russia (our country’s greatest adversary that wants to destroy us) continues to meddle in our elections? Do they care about what was left unsaid in that call? Trump said that, in no point, did he warn Putin not to meddle in the next election. It seems our concerns are misplaced if we worry about a quill and hammer logo and not a gross threat to our democracy that continues unabated throughout this travesty of an administration.

Mary Donnelly, San Luis Obispo

Government should stay out of abortion decision

The article by George Will in the May 6 Tribune addressing the abortion debate was very interesting. However, Mr. Will left out one aspect of the debate that I seldom hear. That is, who has the right to make the decision to have an abortion?

The Supreme Court made the decision that abortion is legal and that should have been the end of the discussion. Legalizing abortion does not mean anyone can be forced to have an abortion. If you are opposed to abortion, it is your choice not to have one.

Deciding to have an abortion is the most intimate and difficult choice I can imagine a woman could ever make. It should not be regulated by the Supreme Court (after they made it legal) or Congress or a state Legislature.

It should be left to the mother, the father, the physician and perhaps their religious counselor. Republicans are always complaining about too much government in our lives, too many taxes, too much regulation and yet they want the government to regulate when and if we should have an abortion? Let’s get government off our backs and out of our lives on this issue!

Maggie Fertschneider, Atascadero

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