Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor: Readers weigh in on Pirate’s Cove, implicit bias

Pirate's Cove between Avila Beach and Shell Beach has had crime, safety and cleanliness problems for years, including an incredibly bumpy parking area and no garbage cans. New plans are in the works to pave the parking lot and provide recycling bins, informational signs about the Native American history in the area and more.
Pirate's Cove between Avila Beach and Shell Beach has had crime, safety and cleanliness problems for years, including an incredibly bumpy parking area and no garbage cans. New plans are in the works to pave the parking lot and provide recycling bins, informational signs about the Native American history in the area and more. ldickinson@thetribunenews.com

I was happy to read that plans to make Pirate’s Cove a safer and more user-friendly experience are still in the works. One of the most beautiful places on the California coast, Pirate’s Cove has been thoughtlessly neglected for too long. I hope the parking issue can be resolved quickly so the county plans can be approved and work can begin to provide the scenic and cultural protection this precious landmark deserves.

Rob Mohle, Avila Beach

Be aware of implicit bias

When journalists cover police shootings of unarmed black boys, men and women, like the one published in The Tribune on March 3 (“No charges in Stephon Clark death”), they often leave out a significant consideration in their coverage: the role of implicit racial bias within police officers, attorneys, judges and juries.

Mounting evidence shows that even when we do not show outward bias toward individuals from certain groups, we often show evidence of discriminatory behaviors that operate outside of conscious awareness.

The consequences of implicit bias within law enforcement are equal parts lethal and tragic, with the lives of black Americans hanging in the balancs. Demonizing police is not productive, nor is it rational. Yet given the unique role police have in our society, we need police to address how the dynamics of implicit bias play out on the job.

Law enforcement has made some strides in this endeavor. In 2017 (finally!), the Department of Justice reported that it formally began integrating findings from psychological science into new training curricula as a way of combating implicit bias. Some police departments also have implemented training, but clearly, more needs to be done.

When journalists ignore the element of implicit racial bias in their coverage of racism, they contribute to the mainstream ignorance surrounding the dynamics within and perpetuation of racism. If we are serious about reducing implicit racial bias, we must elevate our understanding of how our thinking feeds racism. I recommend reading Robin DiAngelo’s newest book, “White Fragility.”

Bailey Drechsler, San Luis Obispo

Don’t put ‘monster’ on front page

On Tuesday, the editors of The Tribune saw fit to take all of the top fold and one-half the bottom fold of the front page and devote it to a monster who allegedly murdered his girlfriend and their unborn child. Complete with photos.

While I subscribe to be informed about local stories and issues, this is not one that deserves the front page treatment you have given it, in my opinion. Ideally, it would not be the first and inescapable thing I see in The Tribune. A less prominent placement inside the paper would be my choice and I think many of your subscribers would agree.

When I moved to SLO 20 years ago and began a subscription, the front page story was about some horse rustling. I congratulated myself on having relocated to a beautiful and relatively peaceful town when compared to the seemingly daily and widely reported urban horror stories that are the big city norm. How and what you choose to print does affect how we feel about our community.

My hope is that when the monster in question is on trial for murder The Tribune will see fit to spare its readers all the gory details.

Mark Sarrow, Templeton

We don’t need a king

I believe that if the citizens of this nation have a sincere desire to go back to a representative democracy, minimize the destructive effects of oligarchy and ensure that church and state remain separate, they must work diligently to make the political party bent on ruling, rather than governing, a minority party for good. It might take a third political party to do it.

If we wanted to be ruled, we would have kept a king.

We cannot let 25 percent of registered voters determine the future of our nation. Amen?

Fabrizio Griguoli, Shell Beach

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