Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor: Readers against noisy helicopters in Arbors, for statues

San Luis Obispo airport dictates the flight plan for helicopters, mostly heading down Broad Street, then making a left turn before returning to the airport. Here, a fire attack helicopter prepares to drop water on the southwestern front of the Chimney Fire.
San Luis Obispo airport dictates the flight plan for helicopters, mostly heading down Broad Street, then making a left turn before returning to the airport. Here, a fire attack helicopter prepares to drop water on the southwestern front of the Chimney Fire. jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

I’ve lived in the same quiet neighborhood (The Arbors) for 30 years and really like the people, homes that are mostly owner-occupied, proximity to good restaurants and stores and the rural setting.

My wife and I even added onto our house twice, to make it more comfortable when friends and family visit. We knew when we moved across town to our current home that the airport was nearby, and the sounds of aircraft were expected and very reasonable.

Lately, though, the frequent droning of a helicopter flying over The Arbors and the French Park area has been increasingly annoying. I recently called the owner of the helicopter school and discussed this. He was very polite and sympathetic, indicating the helicopter school has recently increased its flights to train more students.

He also mentioned that the airport dictates the flight plan for helicopters, mostly heading down Broad Street, then making a left turn before returning to the airport. My questions are: 1) Could these helicopters fly farther away from residential neighborhoods? and 2) Are others in the vicinity of the Arbors/French developments bothered by these frequent flights?

Mark Shelton, San Luis Obispo

Roosevelt statue a ‘fine addition’

The proposed statue of Theodore Roosevelt has initiated a healthy and necessary discussion about our dark past and who we are as a nation. Roosevelt was not a perfect man or a perfect president; we are not a perfect nation.

If we only put up statues of perfect people, there would be no statues. Roosevelt, however, was a great man; a man of his time; a powerful voice for conservation. Had we (and other nations) not followed the trail blazed by Roosevelt and set aside vast swaths of forest and other lands for conservation, we would be that much further down the path of global collapse. I think a statue of Roosevelt — especially one by Paula Zima — would be a fine addition to San Luis Obispo.

Pat Veesart, Santa Margarita

More on monuments

It has become clear that the proposed public art project to commemorate President Theodore Roosevelt is more than a question of the design of a sculpture. As Mayor Heidi Harmon’s thoughtful comments bring to light, this project also questions whether we want to honor anyone publicly at all.

I am an architect and have studied monuments; the most visited seem to be those that are non- figurative, non-portrait like, with a clear visual image like the Washington Monument, the Vietnam Memorial and the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. Applying this approach, a design commemorating Theodore Roosevelt’s creation of our national parks, a treasure for us all, might be sculpted mountains, Half Dome, a canyon and trees accompanied with a plaque.

Regarding the bigger question the mayor raises, why is the city considering having a sculpture made and placed in a city park? Imagining this sculpture in Mitchell Park, who would see it? Would it be a landmark? And what would the message be? I propose a memorial honoring the creation of our national parks: a good message reflecting our city’s and our country’s values.

Jerry Breakstone, San Luis Obispo

  Comments