Letters to the Editor

Octopuses belong in the ocean — not on your dinner plate

Joan, a young giant Pacific octopus, lived for about a year at the Central Coast Aquarium in Avila Beach. She was released back into the wild.
Joan, a young giant Pacific octopus, lived for about a year at the Central Coast Aquarium in Avila Beach. She was released back into the wild. Central Coast Aquarium

Would you eat a dolphin? A whale? A dog? A horse?

Then, please, do not eat octopus.

In the recent past, The Tribune ran stories about Joan, the giant pacific octopus who lived in the Central Coast Aquarium for a year. The Tribune shared with us the facts that octopuses have the intelligence of a 4-year-old and have personality, even a sense of humor.

Then, on Page 3A of Monday’s Tribune, we see a full-color photo of the arm of an octopus, grilled and served on a plate.

To anyone who has experience with living octopuses, this is as repellent as seeing the leg of a dog served up for our dining pleasure.

We all should have more experience with these wondrous creatures.

Joan has returned to the sea. I wish that, while she was in residence at the aquarium in Avila, local chefs had been invited to meet her. Joan was an ambassador for her species.

C.J. Bundy, Los Osos

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