Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor: Readers discuss Women’s March controversy, Scrooge

Dawn Addis, a Morro Bay City Council candidate, attends an election night party in Morro Bay. She has been an avid participant in the Women’s March movement and supports the planned new sewage treatment plant site.
Dawn Addis, a Morro Bay City Council candidate, attends an election night party in Morro Bay. She has been an avid participant in the Women’s March movement and supports the planned new sewage treatment plant site. jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

I’m interested in knowing whether Dawn Addis, recently elected Morro Bay City Council member and local founder of the progressive leftist Women’s March in SLO County movement, and the other local leaders, have called for the resignation of the Women’s March national group leadership.

The controversy within the national organization is regarding its leaders allowing anti-Semitism and other bigoted ideologies to infect the organization’s purposes.

Teresa Shook, founder of the national Women’s March said four co-chairs of the protest group have “steered the Movement away from its true course.”

Shook also stated in a Facebook post that three of those leaders, Tamika Mallory, Carmen Perez and Linda Sarsour, have refused to separate themselves from groups that espouse racist, hateful beliefs and have come under fire for their associations with Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan, long accused of promoting anti-Semitic and anti-LGBT views.

Where do Dawn Addis and other local leaders stand on this controversy? They are outspoken on so many issues, so why not this?

Unfortunately, there has been nothing in The Tribune regarding this controversy, unless I missed it!

Lori Noble, Morro Bay

We aren’t all ‘Scrooges’ in Atascadero

I’m afraid there was a misprint in the recent article and editorial about Atascadero and the use of the Armory as a temporary warming shelter. The Tribune mistakenly said “Atascadero denies shelter” and called Atascadero “Scrooge.”

The mistake lies in that it is the current Atascadero City Council who bah-humbugged the Armory idea, and not all of the citizens of Atascadero. I would be ashamed to be included in this decision.

It is confusing how the council can declare a homeless crisis on one hand and refuse to try out a temporary solution on the other. Most, if not all, the council’s concerns were answered by the group Transitional Food & Shelter. Prejudices and stereotypes seemed to play a large role in the decision, which I, for one, do not support.

Let us not forget that this is the same City Council who embraced both Kelly Gearhart and Walmart. I hope that with new members, the council can try out new ideas as well.

As for Ms. Roberta Fonzi, a current council member who said she has many question marks in her head, I was under the assumption that a council member’s job is to voice and even research those questions before any meeting.

Merry Christmas.

Sandra Buck-Moyer, Atascadero

The Tribune is the real Scrooge

The Sunday editorial was ironic. Singling out Atascadero to solve the county’s homeless problems is ironic because Atascadero is doing more than any other city in the County. ECHO, in Atascadero, is an organization that grew out of volunteers’ compassion and is the best facility in the county.

It was in existence when San Luis Obispo, a city twice its size, was still fighting about a location for their new shelter. Atascadero has ECHO right downtown, not out in the hinterlands near the sewerage treatment plant, like San Luis Obispo.

What about Paso Robles, they ship all of their homeless down to Atascadero. What about the Scrooge Tribune? Why doesn’t The Tribune open up its offices to the homeless? Before you accuse us, take a look at yourself. Our council is right about this. The only homeless who aren’t served by ECHO are those that choose to live outside, have substance abuse or mental health issues and should be cared for by County Health.

Mike Zappas, Atascadero

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