Letters to the Editor

What Anholm neighborhood really needs: Slower traffic

A cyclist bikes towards Cal Poly in the green bike lane along California Boulevard in San Luis Obispo, which was added to increase safety for bicyclists. The current City Council’s plans to add bikeways in the city have been supported by San Luis Obispo Mayor Heidi Harmon and opposed by her challenger, T. Keith Gurnee.
A cyclist bikes towards Cal Poly in the green bike lane along California Boulevard in San Luis Obispo, which was added to increase safety for bicyclists. The current City Council’s plans to add bikeways in the city have been supported by San Luis Obispo Mayor Heidi Harmon and opposed by her challenger, T. Keith Gurnee. jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

I am responding to the Viewpoint by Chenin Otto, regarding the Aug. 14 Planning Comission meeting.

I am one of those “outspoken, retired, upper-middle class” Anholm residents she mentioned.

I have lived in this wonderful,diverse neighborhood since 1984. We are a neighborhood of students, working young adults, families, lots of kids, and yes, a bunch of us “out of touch seniors.”

We are retired teachers, nurses, soccer coaches, scout leaders, school volunteers, etc. We have invested time, sweat and resources to this community. We stand up and speak at meetings because we care about its future. Personally, I live by two mottos: “Do no harm,”and “Leave a place better than you found it.”

My kids rode their bikes to Bishop Peak and high school during the 1980s and ‘90s.

I ride a bike or walk for most of my errands, without any problem.

What we really need is for everyone passing through our neighborhood to just slow down.

Traffic calming, more speed bumps and reduced speed limits, with enforcement, and some good old common sense would help.

Surely the safety of all of our neighbors is something we can agree on.

Debbie Anthony, San Luis Obispo

If Pope Francis knew of abuse, he must resign

The article (about Archbishop Vigano’s letter) comes as no surprise to this devout Catholic of 78 years. The Vatican moves with glacial speed on all matters and even slower on difficult issues.

If Archbishop Vigano, former Vatican Ambassador to the United States and an insider in the Curia — Vatican City’s administrative arm — is correct that Pope Francis knew of the failings of American Cardinal McCarrick and others and was complicit in covering up their abuses, then Francis must resign. The new pope should have the mandate to take action against clerical abuse immediately. In this country, child abuse is a crime and accused abusers are reported to law enforcement and prosecuted in our justice system. Religious leaders should be no exception.

The Catholic Church is losing members in record numbers. I have three suggestions that the Catholic Church should implement to sustain its relevance in today’s world:

Priests should be permitted to marry before or after ordination.

Women should be permitted to serve as priests.

The leadership of the Roman Catholic Church should be decentralized to recognize and address significant differences that exist throughout a world so different from the traditional ethnocentric, authoritarian European model.

Ken Noonan, Morro Bay

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