Letters to the Editor

Public safety should trump Second Amendment

Gregg and Gail Meister, left, of Merchantville, N.J., with Congregation Rodeph Shalom in Philadelphia join political leaders, CeaseFirePA, and churches and synagogues at a vigil in Philadelphia's Thomas Paine Plaza for victims of the Las Vegas shootings, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017.
Gregg and Gail Meister, left, of Merchantville, N.J., with Congregation Rodeph Shalom in Philadelphia join political leaders, CeaseFirePA, and churches and synagogues at a vigil in Philadelphia's Thomas Paine Plaza for victims of the Las Vegas shootings, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. AP

The tragedy at Las Vegas brings the question back to what can be done to prevent this. My own daughter fears concerts and movies because of the tragic commonality of this type of event. Legislation is our strongest approach to curbing this. Obviously, mental illness is a key factor.

In February of this year, Trump and Congress reversed a sensible gun control law that put 75,000 severely mentally ill people on Social Security disability in the database for background check when purchasing a gun. These were persons so ill they needed a trustee to handle their affairs. The database is incomplete due to many health records not being included. The purpose was to guard public safety, after the school massacre of 2012 in Newtown, Connecticut.

At the time, Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut said, “I hope something truly awful doesn’t happen because of this.”

Isn’t it time public safety sensibly trumps Second Amendment rights?

Nancy Walden, San Luis Obispo

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