Letters to the Editor

Taking a hard look at pay for female athletes

United States' Mallory Pugh, left, is congratulated after scoring her side's 2nd goal by teammate Lindsey Horan during a group G match of the women's Olympic football tournament between Colombia and United States at the Arena Amazonia stadium in Manaus, Brazil, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016.
United States' Mallory Pugh, left, is congratulated after scoring her side's 2nd goal by teammate Lindsey Horan during a group G match of the women's Olympic football tournament between Colombia and United States at the Arena Amazonia stadium in Manaus, Brazil, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. AP

As a female who grew up in the world of sports and athletics, I couldn’t help but notice the negative stereotype that females aren’t as athletically skilled as men. Seen in the Always #LikeAGirl campaign video, males and females alike believe in and perpetuate this stereotype. I wondered why this stereotype existed, knowing the demanding work of athletes.

There are numerous female athletes ranging from Billie Jean King to Mo’ne Davis that challenge this negatively held belief, but the United States Women’s National Soccer Team is an especially important indicator of this stereotype. Not only have they been more successful than the U.S. men’s team, but, according to Louisa Thomas, the women’s team brought in “$20 million more in revenue for U.S. soccer then the men’s team.” Yet, the men make much more money than the women. Why is this happening? Aren’t athletes supposed to be rewarded for their success and earned revenue?

Society indoctrinates within our minds many beliefs that we don’t even stop to question. This is the problem. Thus, it is important to stop and reflect why we believe the way we do and how our beliefs manifest in the real world. Is it justified?

Megan Miyake, San Luis Obispo

  Comments