Letters to the Editor

How will Trump’s obsession with ratings affect plans to deal with North Korea?

President Donald Trump talks to reporters during a meeting with Dr. Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under President Richard Nixon, in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Washington.
President Donald Trump talks to reporters during a meeting with Dr. Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under President Richard Nixon, in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Washington. AP

In the discipline of organizational behavior, it is hypothesized that first-rate people recruit and bring into their organization first-rate people, second-rate people bring in third-rate people, while third-rate people bring in fifth-rate people. The overall quality of the leader’s appointments are thought to be a reflection of the quality of the leader.

Donald Trump has brought into his organization less-than-stellar people like Michael Flynn and Jeff Sessions. He has displayed an incompetence and ignorance of what it takes to be president. He has proclaimed that he didn’t realize that health care and the history of North Korea were so complicated.

He has also shown that he is overly concerned with his ratings. What is of concern here is that he noticed after launching some 59 missiles on a Syrian airfield that his ratings went up. This is a typical reaction by the American people to “rally around the flag” over an event like this. Because Trump has the lowest ratings of any modern-day president at this stage of his term, and because he is overly sensitive to his ratings, will he risk a military action with North Korea as a means to bolster his numbers?

David L. George, Morro Bay

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