Letters to the Editor

March for Science wasn’t for science. It was for a politically powerful cause.

Protesters move down 14th Street during a march for science Saturday, April 22, 2017, in Denver. The Mile High City is joining communities around the globe where people are marching to defend scientific work from attacks including U.S. government budget cuts.
Protesters move down 14th Street during a march for science Saturday, April 22, 2017, in Denver. The Mile High City is joining communities around the globe where people are marching to defend scientific work from attacks including U.S. government budget cuts. AP

Our constitutionally guaranteed rights of speech and assembly were not instituted as a guard against a known history of scientific oppression. They were instituted as a guard against political oppression and tyranny.

Politics, as often as not, stand at odds with science because politics are causes wholly made by man, and often in spite of science; “out of thin air,” to quote a phrase (pun intended).

Science, on the contrary, is the observations made by men and women, and it cannot be created or formed to suit any cause.

In an interesting twist of scientific irony, many historical tyrants claimed that the reasons for their political oppression were based in science. Science hijacked by politics in a quest for a more perfect society.

A march for science is a contradiction. It supposes two false premises. First, that science has a foe that can actually change science by political means. And second, that there are people who oppose science and want to change it.

Like much in today’s politics, names have been changed to protect against the truth. This march is not for science, but for a cause — a politically powerful cause.

Chris Temple, Atascadero

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