Letters to the Editor

There is a movement to shutter the Election Assistance Commission. Don’t let this happen.

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission is an independent, bipartisan commission created by the Help America Vote Act of 2002.
The U.S. Election Assistance Commission is an independent, bipartisan commission created by the Help America Vote Act of 2002. Associated Press file

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission, established by the Help America Vote Act of 2002, is an independent, bipartisan commission that develops guidance for state and local election officials to ensure the integrity of the voting system and serves as a national clearinghouse for information on election administration.

The EAC accredits testing laboratories, certifies voting systems, sets standards for voting machines and ensures accessibility at the polls for voters with disabilities. Local election officials, including ours in San Luis Obispo County, rely on the EAC to provide “best practices” on election administration.

Despite providing these essential services, and amid the continuing controversy surrounding the last election, there is a movement in Congress to terminate the EAC — the only federal entity devoted exclusively to improving election administration on a bipartisan basis.

The League of Women Voters urges Congress to provide the EAC with the resources it needs to protect our voting system from manipulation and corruption and ensure that state and local officials have the information they need to conduct elections locally.

Elections are the life blood of a democracy. We urge all concerned citizens and our representative in Washington, Salud Carbajal, to actively oppose H.R. 634, the Election Assistance Commission Termination Act.

Marguerite Bader, president, League of Women Voters of San Luis Obispo County

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