Letters to the Editor

Apparently some people value their cars over their health care

In this Wednesday, March 22, 2017 photo, Spencer Worley of Castle Rock, Colo., joins other protesters against the failed Republican-proposed health care act in a demonstration outside the office of U.S. Rep. Ken Buck in Castle Rock, Colo.
In this Wednesday, March 22, 2017 photo, Spencer Worley of Castle Rock, Colo., joins other protesters against the failed Republican-proposed health care act in a demonstration outside the office of U.S. Rep. Ken Buck in Castle Rock, Colo. AP

Nobody but nobody who values his or her economic well-being should be without medical insurance. Even invincible young people may be struck down by devastating illnesses — perhaps not in the same numbers as their elders, but nonetheless they are not immune. In addition, catastrophic accidents can happen to anyone at any age.

The idea that a frustrated supreme individualist cannot tolerate a government mandate for universal health insurance is laughable. These same rugged souls seem to have no difficulty in purchasing automobile insurance, which is also generally mandated by law. Apparently, some of us value our cars more than our bodies.

Hidden in the wording of the GOP’s replacement health care bill is the removal of the Affordable Care Act’s limit on the corporate deduction for insurance executive pay at $500,000. It will rise to $1,000,000. This is more money than many Americans will see in a lifetime. Wonder how this compensation contributes to those ever-increasing premiums? Wonder who is lobbying the Republican politicians promoting this bill?

Radical conservatives who wish to hide their mean policies under the skirts of Christianity and “family values” should recall that the first, true and perhaps only Christian so prized the medical arts that He gave healing for free.

Joan M. Decker, Morro Bay

  Comments