Letters to the Editor

Tech education will help spur economic growth and prepare workers

Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham submits his first piece of legislation on Feb. 10, 2017, at the state Capitol.
Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham submits his first piece of legislation on Feb. 10, 2017, at the state Capitol.

The information technology industry relies on a robust and innovative workforce that allows companies like ours (Clever Ducks) to grow and stay ahead of the curve. Many companies in our area struggle to find the qualified talent needed to fill open positions. With the growing demands on cybersecurity, the internet of things and our overall reliance on technology, these skilled workers are going to be in even higher demand in years to come.

At a state level, we applaud Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham for his efforts with Assembly Bill 445. Nationally, we are working in Washington, D.C., for a “Fly-In” organized by CompTIA that advocates on behalf of the tech community. We will have the opportunity to meet with our elected members of Congress and share these concerns about our next generation of IT workforce.

Many of the skills necessary to fill these high-skilled positions do not require a four-year degree but rather can begin in K-12, continue into community college and include a variety of industry-recognized certifications. We plan to share a plan with our representatives about the need to incentivize educators, students and employers to adopt alternative education models that include industry-led, work-based learning helping to fill job openings and spur economic growth.

Amy and Peter Kardel, San Luis Obispo

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