Letters to the Editor

The Electoral College is still relevant, important to less populous states

Republican lawmakers applaud after an objection to a ballot count was overturned during a joint session of Congress to count the Electoral College ballots in Washington, Friday, Jan. 6, 2017.
Republican lawmakers applaud after an objection to a ballot count was overturned during a joint session of Congress to count the Electoral College ballots in Washington, Friday, Jan. 6, 2017. The Associated Press

To all readers of the editorial (“It’s time to end the Electoral College”) by the New York Times published in The Tribune on Dec. 21: Don’t pay any attention to the bull-ony the liberals like the New York Times spread around about one-man-one-vote “democracy.”

The Electoral College is imbedded in the U.S. Constitution. It was intended by the founders to prevent perpetual domination of the voting process by large population and big-city interests.

If folks living in “boondock” states like Nebraska, Iowa, Wyoming and many others lost the Electoral College, their vote wouldn’t amount to a pimple on the backside of any presidential election in this country.

John D. Braun, Paso Robles

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