Weather

Paso Robles could be roasting in record heat by the weekend

Families take the plunge at The Ravine Water Park to cool off

The hot weather drove people to the Paso Robles' water park and the beaches on this sweltering Father's Day, Sunday, June 18, 2017.
Up Next
The hot weather drove people to the Paso Robles' water park and the beaches on this sweltering Father's Day, Sunday, June 18, 2017.

After a few days of unseasonably chilly weather, San Luis Obispo County will take a sudden turn toward summer with the arrival of a heat wave that could set records in the North County.

The warm weather could reach triple digits by Wednesday, PG&E meteorologist John Lindsey said, one day before the official start of summer.

On Saturday, he predicted Paso Robles will reach a high of 107 degrees, tying the June 23 record set 54 years ago. The record high for the month of June was set on June 15, 1961, when the county experienced an unprecedented heat wave that topped out at 115 degrees, according to Intellicast.

Although the North County will experience extreme heat this week, cities in the coastal valleys, such as San Luis Obispo and Avila, can expect weather in the low 80s.

Lindsey compared the weekend forecast to a car’s air conditioning.

The Charles Paddock Zoo in Atascadero had to get creative to keep its animals cool during the June heat wave that San Luis Obispo County — and the rest of the West Coast — is experiencing. This fisher got a pile of ice in its habitat, while others

“People in the front seat, like Avila, can feel the air conditioning,” Lindsey said. “But for the people in the back, like Paso Robles, the air conditioning is not strong enough to reach them.”

The analogy, Lindsey said, explains how the coastal winds blowing inland are not able to make it over the Cuesta Grade to cool the North County.

The National Weather Service has not yet issued a heat advisory, but Lindsey recommended people find a cool place to stay, limit physical activity and remain hydrated.

Heat exhaustion or heat stroke may occur if people are dehydrated and work in a warm environment or exercise in extreme heat. Seniors, children and pets are considered to be at a high risk of heat exhaustion.

Related stories from San Luis Obispo Tribune

  Comments