Elections

Stuck in a long line trying to vote? This group will send you free pizza while you wait

Even Matthew McConaughey waited in a long Texas early voting line

Actor Matthew McConaughey told the AP in an interview that he voted on October 27, 2018 braving an hour and a quarter wait in line at an early polling place. His permanent home is in the Austin, Texas area.
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Actor Matthew McConaughey told the AP in an interview that he voted on October 27, 2018 braving an hour and a quarter wait in line at an early polling place. His permanent home is in the Austin, Texas area.

If you find yourself stuck in a long line to vote on Tuesday, a nonprofit group will help make the wait more palatable.

Pizza to the Polls will send free pizzas from local pizzerias to voters waiting in long lines at their polling places this Election Day, to make it easier for citizens to take the time to do their civic duty.

Even better? It works anywhere in the United States — as long as there is a nearby pizza place.

According to its website, Pizza to the Polls was founded the weekend before Election Day in 2016, amid news of long lines at early voting locations around the country.

“Americans are hungry for democracy and are turning out in record numbers to vote,” reads the group’s website. “But that means long lines and sometimes empty stomachs, which might discourage these brave patriots from performing their civic duty.”

And it’s easy as — well — pie: Just snap a pic or video of the long line as you are waiting, share it to social media and then copy the link to the form on the organization’s website. (Be sure to include the address and a phone number so they can follow up and ensure the pizzas arrive.)

From there, they’ll determine how many pizzas are needed and then order them from the nearest pizza place. The delivery person is then asked to give the pizzas to anyone in line.

Cynthia Kearns first heard about the organization on Twitter, so when she was greeted with a long voting line at the Hamilton County Board of Elections in Cincinnati on Sunday, she decided to test it out.

“It was something no one around me had heard about and people were quite skeptical,” Kearns wrote in a Twitter exchange with The San Luis Obispo Tribune. “I wondered how Pizza to the Polls would possibly find our group in such a long line but the delivery person appeared about 15 minutes before we went in to vote.”

Kearns said the best part of the exchange was connecting with someone through social media who had just donated money to Pizza to the Polls.

“It was great looking down the line to see 80+ people eating pizza but best part was meeting a great guy in Washington who had just donated and was cheering us on,” she wrote. “We ended up texting and tweeting through the night and now follow each other.”

So far this year, the organization has sent 923 pizzas to 70 polling places around the country, according to its website. It’s raised about $35,800 to pay for the pies.

Even if you don’t want a pizza yourself, you can donate to the group so others can get a side of pepperoni with their democracy.

To donate or request pizzas, check out their website at https://polls.pizza/.

Kaytlyn Leslie: 805-781-7928, @kaytyleslie

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