Education

San Luis Obispo High students bury time capsule to open in 25 years

Why SLO High students are burying a time capsule

San Luis Obispo High School students buried a time capsule filled with school memorabilia on Friday, June 3, 2016. It will be opened in 2041 — 25 years from now.
Up Next
San Luis Obispo High School students buried a time capsule filled with school memorabilia on Friday, June 3, 2016. It will be opened in 2041 — 25 years from now.

In the year 2041, San Luis Obispo High School students will crack open a treasure trove buried beneath the soil of the campus.

The school’s Associated Student Body, as a senior class gift, buried a time capsule replete with student letters, pictures, yearbooks, newspapers, spirit wear and more on Friday.

The students placed the items inside a sealed aluminum container, wrapped by four plastic trash bags and placed in an ice cooler tightened with silicon seal.

Next week, they’ll pour concrete over the burial site and add a plaque to preserve it.

The moment was celebrated before a lunchtime crowd of San Luis Obispo High seniors as a way to commemorate the campus before Measure D bond expenditures will alter its look. It was accompanied by open-mic musical performances from groups such as “The Steamy Hendrix Experience,” a ’70s-esque rock band, .

It’s a very diverse collection. Every single student on campus had the opportunity to contribute.

Bella Stenvall, San Luis Obispo High student president

The $177 million bond measure that voters passed in 2014 will repair and construct facilities at both of the San Luis Coastal school district’s main high schools and at its small continuation high school.

“To commemorate (the bond construction) and our senior class, which is moving on in about a week now, we thought we’d collect a lot of different items that really signified what our class and school look like before the architecture changes,” said Bella Stenvall, the school’s student body president.

ASB’s Vice President Max Teaford researched how to best preserve the time capsule so it wouldn’t deteriorate over time. And Teaford and his friends added a musical contribution to the mix of goodies.

“It’s a rap album we made,” Teaford said. “I’m not saying it’s good, but it will be something to remember us by.”

His fellow student government mates, however, said it will be famous when they return for their reunion in 25 years.

“It’s going to be very valuable,” said Grace Slocum, the senior class officer.

It was very much a school-wide effort.

Bella Stenvall, San Luis Obispo High student president

Slocum was part of the effort to raise funds for the gift through proceeds from school dances and other events. They spent $400 toward the materials used in the time capsule.

The capsule weighs an estimated 40 pounds, according to the students.

“It was very much a schoolwide effort,” said Stenvall, who will attend Harvard University in the fall. “We have a couple dozen letters from students talking about what life is like now. They’re very elaborate and very thorough, as well as a bunch of pictures that our social media officers took of the campus.”

The container also includes letters of college acceptances, student CDs, poems and student magazines.

“It’s a very diverse collection,” Stenvall said. “Every single student on campus had the opportunity to contribute.”

  Comments