The Cambrian

New restaurant The Spot offers menu items that ‘switch it up’ from Cambria’s norm

From left, Jesus Hernandez, MaryLyn Reveles, Carmen Flores, Stephanie Reveles and Alejandro Molina of The Spot. Flores is showing off a ‘Berry Yummy’ oversized strawberry crepe, and Molina is holding a yogurt parfait with strawberries, raspberries and blueberries.
From left, Jesus Hernandez, MaryLyn Reveles, Carmen Flores, Stephanie Reveles and Alejandro Molina of The Spot. Flores is showing off a ‘Berry Yummy’ oversized strawberry crepe, and Molina is holding a yogurt parfait with strawberries, raspberries and blueberries. ktanner@thetribunenews.com

North Coast restaurant patrons have been buzzing online recently about The Spot, a small new entry into Cambria’s assortment of interesting eateries.

The Spot’s menu is filled with unusual paninis, large sweet and savory crepes, lightly grilled wraps, specialty-topped toasts, fresh-squeezed juices, fresh fruits and bowls, and other breakfast and lunch entrees.

The variety is eclectic enough to be intriguing amid the town’s customary assortment of California cuisine, ethnic menus and down-home cooking.

Think regular items and specials that include nectarine almond crepes, caprese toast, steak-and-mushroom crepe, acai bowls, a French-onion tri-tip panini, bacon-tomato-spinach strata, chia seed pudding, farmers market crepe, kale toast, the Cubano panini, achiote chicken coop crepe and much more.

It’s an ambitious menu for a 20-seat café with a small kitchen.

07-24-18 MaryLyn Hernandez mushroom-spinach crepe The Spot c.jpg
As seen through the demonstration window at The Spot restaurant, MaryLyn Reveles creates an oversized mushroom-spinach crepe. Kathe Tanner ktanner@thetribunenews.com

The Spot is at 1235 Knollwood Circle, Suite C202, upstairs across Knollwood from Cookie Crock, and tucked behind the community gym. The café fronts on the upper parking lot area. Formal hours for breakfast are 7 to 11 a.m., and otherwise from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with crepes available throughout the day. But the chefs can be cajoled into providing other breakfast entrees later in the day, too.

How Jesus Hernandez, wife MaryLyn Reveles and her sister Stephanie Reveles wound up in Cambria serving such a diverse assortment of food was pretty much up to the fates.

Hernandez graduated from Morro Bay High School in 2001 and worked his way through Cal Poly at Tahoe Joe’s in San Luis Obispo and at Dorn’s Original Breakers Café in Morro Bay, accumulating a dozen or so years of restaurant experience.

Then “my wife and family decided they wanted to open a little restaurant business,” he said. “At first, we thought Mexican food, because it was what we knew how to make.”

They “looked at different places in Los Osos, where I live,” he said, “but it was difficult there. After a few months, we decided to try in Cambria, but Cambria doesn’t need more Mexican food. So, we decided to switch it up.”

His wife suggested such options as panini-style sandwiches and innovatively filled crepes, among other ideas.

They hired Los Osos chef Beto Gonzales, Hernandez’s friend from high school

“We gave him our ideas, and he did menu research,” Hernandez said, eventually presenting the family with 50 entrée options.

“We tried them, tested them and narrowed it down to the ones we like best,” he said.

That’s what’s on the menu now, more than 30 options plus specials.

Soon, they’ll make a few minor changes before putting the menu on a more permanent bill of fare. For instance, he said, “we served our banana toast with Nutella,” but customers seemed to prefer their occasional special that featured almond butter instead.

For details, call 805-203-7000.

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