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You might see smoke in parts of San Luis Obispo County. Here’s why.

How to prepare for and avoid starting wildfires in SLO County

Cal Fire Deputy Chief Eric Cleveland of San Luis Obispo offers a few tips for ranch fire preparedness and talks about a mapping effort on Santa Margarita Ranch.
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Cal Fire Deputy Chief Eric Cleveland of San Luis Obispo offers a few tips for ranch fire preparedness and talks about a mapping effort on Santa Margarita Ranch.

You might see smoke in various parts of San Luis Obispo County over the next two to three weeks — but wildfires aren’t the cause.

Cal Fire said it plans to conduct five prescribed burns from Thursday through July 2.

The first burn begins Thursday, when firefighters plan to burn about 10 acres of grass at the Cal Fire station off Airport Road in Paso Robles. Smoke may be seen from 9 to 11 a.m., Cal Fire said.

On Friday, firefighters plan to burn about 230 acres of grass on the Foxtrot Range at Camp San Luis Obispo, Cal Fire said.

“The burn is necessary to prevent an unplanned ignition that could occur from upcoming live munitions training by the military,” the agency said.

People in the San Luis Obispo area will see smoke from about 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. during the burn, according to Cal Fire.

On Saturday, firefighters will burn about 40 acres of grass in the southeast corner of Shandon, Cal Fire said. Smoke will be visible southeast of Shandon from about 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Cal Fire said.

On June 24, firefighters plan to burn about 26 acres of “light fuels” east of Santa Margarita in the area of 7 Oaks Road to help maintain an existing fuel break, Cal Fire said.

The last burn will happen on Tuesday, July 2, at the San Luis Obispo Sportsmen’s Association range off Gilardi Road in San Luis Obispo, Cal Fire said. Firefighters will burn about 326 acres of grass to help reduce the fire hazard.

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