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Man killed in crash with military vehicle near Cholame ‘Y’ identified

Cholame Y crash involving military vehicle results in 1 death

One person was killed in a reported head-on car crash near Cholame Y, between a military vehicle and a small vehicle, Wednesday morning on Highway 46 in California.
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One person was killed in a reported head-on car crash near Cholame Y, between a military vehicle and a small vehicle, Wednesday morning on Highway 46 in California.

Update, 8:40 a.m.

The California Highway Patrol identified the man who died as Chan Kee Chung, 58, of Rowland Heights, California.

Original story:

One person was killed and two others were injured in a head-on collision between a military cargo truck and a sedan Wednesday morning, according to the California Highway Patrol.

Just before 7:45 a.m., a 49-year-old Army Reserve sergeant from San Bernardino was driving the cargo truck in a military convoy that was traveling eastbound on Highway 46, just west of the Cholame “Y,” according to the CHP.

At the same time, a 58-year-old man from Rowland Heights was driving a 2000 Acura TL west on Highway 46.

The front left tire of the military vehicle “suffered a sudden failure,” the CHP said, which caused the vehicle to go across the center line and into the westbound lanes of traffic.

The cargo truck and the Acura collided head on, killing the driver of the Acura. The driver has not yet been identified.

The driver of the cargo truck, along with a 24-year-old Army Reserve specialist who was also riding in the vehicle, were taken to Twin Cities Community Hospital with minor injuries.

Initial reports of the crash identified the military vehicle as a Humvee, however “this was a larger vehicle that has a covered bed on it that appears to be used for troop or cargo transport,” according to CHP Officer Patrick Seebart. No one was in the back of the cargo truck at the time of the crash.

Drugs and alcohol do not appear to be factors in the collision, Seebart said, and the investigation is ongoing.

The Cholame “Y” has been dubbed “Blood Alley,” as it sees more motorist fatalities than the California average. Funding from the state gas tax is expected to help bring a fix, but voters could repeal it in November 2018.

Caltrans has completed about $300 million in upgrades to the deadly stretch of Highway 46/41 that has often been called Blood Alley. That stretch of highway in northern San Luis Obispo County has claimed six lives in two months at the beginning of

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