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The roosters of where? Another SLO County city gets its own feral flock

A rooster plays chicken with traffic in the Village of Arroyo Grande in 2015. The birds are a common sight in the South County city.
A rooster plays chicken with traffic in the Village of Arroyo Grande in 2015. The birds are a common sight in the South County city. jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

No, your eyes aren't deceiving you: There really are fewer roosters in the Village of Arroyo Grande.

Illegal dumping led to the population ballooning to more than 55 roosters, according to Arroyo Grande Roosters, a Facebook page set up to celebrate the feral fowl.

"The main reason that we were moving them is because we had too many in our village," Arroyo Grande Public Works Director Bill Robeson said. "The number was getting to the point where the roosters were becoming increasingly aggressive with each other and the people down in the village."

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Robeson said his office reached out to local ranchers and other organizations but didn't find many takers.

"Most of them weren't interested in taking 20 roosters," he said.

But then, the Old Towne Nipomo Association reached out to Robeson, offering to allow some of the roosters to be relocated to a plot of land downtown. On the evening of April 23, Robeson said he personally oversaw the capture and transfer of about half the rooster population of Arroyo Grande.

"We just wanted to make sure we could relocate a number of them to a good home that was equivalent to our area," he said.

Robeson said he wasn't too worried about the roosters of Nipomo stealing the spotlight from the roosters of AG.

"I think there's enough interest in the roosters to go around," he said.

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