These parallel lines of Langmuir circulation were easily seen at Port San Luis last week. They resemble corresponding paths of dark and light lines on the ocean’s surface that linger up and down the coastline. The scientist who discovered this was Irving Langmuir, who was born in January 1881 in Brooklyn, N.Y. When the winds blow across a flat ocean, long sets of shallow parallel counter-rotating vortices form in the surface waters. These can also develop in lakes and even slow-flowing rivers.
These parallel lines of Langmuir circulation were easily seen at Port San Luis last week. They resemble corresponding paths of dark and light lines on the ocean’s surface that linger up and down the coastline. The scientist who discovered this was Irving Langmuir, who was born in January 1881 in Brooklyn, N.Y. When the winds blow across a flat ocean, long sets of shallow parallel counter-rotating vortices form in the surface waters. These can also develop in lakes and even slow-flowing rivers. John Lindsey
These parallel lines of Langmuir circulation were easily seen at Port San Luis last week. They resemble corresponding paths of dark and light lines on the ocean’s surface that linger up and down the coastline. The scientist who discovered this was Irving Langmuir, who was born in January 1881 in Brooklyn, N.Y. When the winds blow across a flat ocean, long sets of shallow parallel counter-rotating vortices form in the surface waters. These can also develop in lakes and even slow-flowing rivers. John Lindsey