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Where does SLO County get its money and how is it spent?

Here's what SLO County's budget could look like next year

The San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors released its budget priorities and breakdown of the 2017-18 recommended financial plan, from information on taxes to expenditures.
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The San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors released its budget priorities and breakdown of the 2017-18 recommended financial plan, from information on taxes to expenditures.

On Monday, five elected officials will begin discussing how San Luis Obispo County should spend $590 million to provide services to county residents in the fiscal year starting July 1.

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What does the county government do?

The county employs about 2,700 people and is responsible for providing services such as road maintenance, fire protection and policing in areas of the county that are outside city limits, like Avila Beach, Cambria, Los Osos, Nipomo, Oceano, Shandon and Templeton.

The county government also provides countywide services. It runs the airport, the jail, and oversees the distribution of social services such as CalFresh.

 

Where does the county get its money?

▪  43 percent: Federal and state governments to pay for mandated programs that the county runs.

▪  32 percent: Locally-paid taxes, including property tax, sales tax, transient occupancy tax and other taxes.

▪  The rest: Other sources, such as fees for services and permits, and interest from the investment of county funds.

Where does the money go?

▪  38 percent: Health and social services, which includes the agency that provides services for public health and behavioral health, Social Services that provides services like foster care and CalWorks, and Veterans Services.

▪  26 percent: Public safety and protection, which includes the Sheriff’s Office, District Attorney’s Office, Public Defender, Probation Department, Child Support Services, Animal Services and County Fire.

▪  11 percent: Land management, which a includes Agriculture, Planning and Building and Public Works.

▪  The rest: Other services and programs, such as libraries, parks, golf courses, human resources for county employees, financial services and administrators.

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