Pet Tales

Max the cat wants you to spay, neuter and adopt

Max is among the cats available for adoption at the San Luis Obispo County Animal Services’ shelter. Max has already neutered, been given a microchip, has tested negative for feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus, and comes with all his initial shots and a cardboard cat carrier.
Max is among the cats available for adoption at the San Luis Obispo County Animal Services’ shelter. Max has already neutered, been given a microchip, has tested negative for feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus, and comes with all his initial shots and a cardboard cat carrier.

This week, San Luis Obispo County Animal Services’ shelter volunteer Ellen Perryess shares the story of Max:

Max is in a quandary.

After spending five years honing his cat skills, how does a well-groomed, curious cat who’s appreciative of human attention — excelling at both window- and sofa-lounging — end up at the SLO County Animal Services’ shelter?

Mostly, wonderful pets become homeless because of unforeseen changes in human lives: pets not allowed, moving or a death in the family. The list goes on and on.

Another reason looms large on the horizon: Spring’s unplanned litters of kittens and puppies.

To prevent this, Max suggests that now is an excellent time to alter your pet. Woods Humane Society provides low-cost spay and neuter surgeries for dogs and cats. The Feline Network also provides assistance for altering cats. For more information, call Woods Humane Society at 805-540-2692 or the Feline Network at 805-549-9228, ext. 706.

Max would also like to mention that one of the benefits of adopting from a county shelter or a reputable rescue group is that all the dogs and cats are already spayed or neutered. In addition to preventing unwanted litters and reducing animal shelter populations, neutering decreases undesirable behaviors such as roaming, spraying and aggression, and it prevents some forms of cancer.

So, on top of being a friendly cat who appreciates head rubs, Max is already neutered, has been given a microchip, has tested negative for feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus, and comes with all his initial shots and a cardboard cat carrier.

Max’s quandary will end only when someone invites him home.

Spay, neuter and adopt — people are the solution.

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For more information about Max (ID No. 215908), call the volunteer line at the Animal Services’ shelter at 805-781-4413 or visit www.slocounty.ca.gov/aserv. The shelter is at 885 Oklahoma Ave., off Highway 1 in San Luis Obispo. Visit the website to see more shelter animals available for adoption.

The adoption fee is $81 for cats and $105 for dogs, plus a $27 county license fee for dogs if the adopters are San Luis Obispo County residents. The adoption fee includes a spay or neuter operation, basic vaccinations, a microchip, eligibility for a free veterinary check within San Luis Obispo County and a new collar. Cat adopters also receive a carrier and are tested for FeLV and FIV.

If you have stories of your pet, or photos of your furry, feathered or scaly friend, send them to pettales@thetribunenews.com, or Pet Tales, c/o The Tribune, P.O. Box 112, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406.

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