Letters to the Editor

Closure of Diablo Canyon will make living in California harder

This aerial photo taken, June 20, 2010, shows the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in Avila Beach.
This aerial photo taken, June 20, 2010, shows the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in Avila Beach. Associated Press

I am personally saddened by PG&E’s decision not to seek licensing renewal for Diablo Canyon for the remainder of its useful life.

Developing renewable resources and clean power innovation is the door to tomorrow, but I believe we are turning our backs too soon from one of the cleanest, most efficient and most durable ways of producing power today.

My family, along with the families of the 1,500 other professionals employed there, will be facing some difficult choices ahead.

Our schools will face dramatic budget cuts as $100 million in property tax revenue goes away. Another estimated 1,700 jobs in the area will be indirectly lost. Our state will also lose 9 percent of its total energy supply when the grid is already under significant pressure to keep up with demand. And unfortunately, our nonprofit organizations will lose a generous partner in the amazing charitable work done in the community.

It will take a lot of work and prayer to overcome this, and I am afraid our well-intentioned protests aimed at accelerating our progress to the future will have grave unforeseen personal consequences before we get there. Who will step up to fill this gap?

Jeffrey Bower, Templeton

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