Letters to the Editor

During California’s drought, hold politicians accountable on development

In a July 2015 photo, Will Scott Jr. farms about 40 acres of vegetables near Raisin City. The well on a rental property he has there was going dry so he was unable to rent it. He planted only 15 acres at a time due to lack of water.
In a July 2015 photo, Will Scott Jr. farms about 40 acres of vegetables near Raisin City. The well on a rental property he has there was going dry so he was unable to rent it. He planted only 15 acres at a time due to lack of water. The Fresno Bee

Jane Carey (“Where would water come from for Paso Robles home project?,” June 9) asks, “Where (is) the water for 271 new homes in the River Oaks development coming from?” She wonders what the Paso Robles Planning Commission has been thinking. She opines that if the Paso Robles City Council approves the project, “it will be the height of civic irresponsibility.”

Ms. Carey’s fears are perhaps unfounded. Donald Trump has publicly and authoritatively assured Californians that there is no drought and that, once he is elected president, he will solve the state’s water problems.

In the meantime, however, prudent citizens would do well to emulate Ms. Carey’s outspokenness and hold to the fire the feet of any politicians, councils or commissions who want to increase county water consumption until, whether through acts of nature or the legerdemain of a snake oil salesman, county water levels are again at or above normal levels.

New housing projects throughout the county at this time seem to reflect an attitude of greed at the expense of what Ms. Carey has rightly called a “precious and dwindling resource.”

Jim Wagner, Los Osos

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