Letters to the Editor

Help future students

Terry Reece, director of facility services, planning and capital projects points out the problems with the roof on top of the women's P.E. building at Cuesta College. The Cuesta Board of Trustees will decide on July 9 if they will put a bond on the November ballot for up to $347 million.
Photo by Joe Johnston 07-02-14
Terry Reece, director of facility services, planning and capital projects points out the problems with the roof on top of the women's P.E. building at Cuesta College. The Cuesta Board of Trustees will decide on July 9 if they will put a bond on the November ballot for up to $347 million. Photo by Joe Johnston 07-02-14 jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

In his Oct. 16 Viewpoint (“Measure L, Cuesta College bond, is flawed in structure”), Mr. Fred Hoey lays out his complaints concerning Measure L. His most serious charge is that Cuesta College is in financial straits because “there has been a long-standing lack of focus by the trustees.” He also intimates that problems could have been prevented if the trustees had had the focus of boards found in private enterprise.

His accusation is not only erroneous, but it also does a disservice to all Cuesta trustees, past and present. Had he done a little research, he would have discovered, for example, that our board is chaired by an executive at a private enterprise: Patrick Mullen of PG&E.

In fact, many of the problems Mr. Hoey describes are attributable not to mismanagement, but to political climate. Unlike private businesses, schools such as Cuesta are funded with public monies, and that funding is at the mercy of politicians and voters. It is no secret that the mood among many politicians and voters nowadays is, “No new taxes for any purpose.”

I take a different view. Like Mr. Hoey, I’m a retired man and have little to gain from improvements at Cuesta College. But I would consider myself disgraced if I ever voted to deprive future generations of the same opportunity for a quality public education that voters of my parents’ and grandparents’ generations gave me.

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