Letters to the Editor

Founding Fathers never intended arms for everyone

Protesters attend a rally at the Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to demand government action on firearms, on Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. Their call to action is a response the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.
Protesters attend a rally at the Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to demand government action on firearms, on Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. Their call to action is a response the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. TNS

In his letter, “Second Amendment is not for hunting,” Chris Temple makes the same error I see over and over.

His arguments are based on his contention that “the Founding Fathers included a citizens’ right to bear weapons.” They did not! They gave the members of a “well regulated militia” the right to bear arms. They understood the difference.

The Founding Fathers could not get the consensus or the cash from the colonies to create a standing army. History made them reticent to create a standing army that might someday attempt to overthrow the government. Hence, their need for a “well regulated militia.” The Supreme Court later interpreted the Second Amendment by essentially substituting the word “citizen” for “well regulated militia,” but we all know Supreme Court decisions we agree and disagree with.

The Founding Fathers didn’t intend to give every citizen the right to bear arms. I agree that a law-abiding, mentally competent citizen should have that right. However, if a militia should be “well regulated,” then the citizens should be extremely well regulated. The Constitution doesn’t give Chris the right to bear “people killers.”

Assault weapons have no place in the hands of citizens.

Brian Roberts, San Luis Obispo

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