Letters to the Editor

Why the secrecy about Trump’s national monument recommendations?

What makes Carrizo Plain National Monument unique

Johna Hurl, Carrizo Plain National Monument manager, talks about the monument's unique features during a tour to commemorate its 15th anniversary Wednesday, June 1, 2016.
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Johna Hurl, Carrizo Plain National Monument manager, talks about the monument's unique features during a tour to commemorate its 15th anniversary Wednesday, June 1, 2016.

The “review” of Carrizo Plain National Monument is not over by any means. The Tribune’s headline last month that the monument “would not be eliminated” was simply a play on words.

A reduction of 95 percent is not elimination. There were going to be reductions in “only a handful” of monuments — another play on words. How many M&M’s are in a “handful”? The public had 60 days to comment on this “review,” and responded with 2.7 million comments, the vast majority of which said leave our monuments alone.

On Aug. 24, Secretary Ryan Zinke was to submit his recommendations to the president, which presumably he did. But no one knows what they were. Why the secrecy? What is there to hide, and why? What a sad commentary on our officials, who should love and cherish our national parks, monuments, wildlife refuges, forests and grasslands, which all stand as examples of this nation’s best idea.

Certain folks say, what is wrong with a review? The answer is, nothing, if it is truly just a review. But a review doesn’t happen that way; there is usually a hidden agenda somewhere. Come on, Mr. Secretary, step up and tell us the truth.

Neil Havlik, San Luis Obispo

The wildflowers are in bloom in San Luis Obispo County - especially along Highway 58 near the Carrizo Plain National Monument. The especially wet winter has led to an explosion of wildflowers along the Central Coast. The 2017 season is expected to

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