Letters to the Editor

Fighting fossil fuels is about clean air, not just climate change

Scientists hold signs during a rally in conjunction with the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, in San Francisco. The rally was to call attention to what scientist believe is unwarranted attacks by the incoming Trump administration against scientists advocating for the issue of climate change and its impact.
Scientists hold signs during a rally in conjunction with the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, in San Francisco. The rally was to call attention to what scientist believe is unwarranted attacks by the incoming Trump administration against scientists advocating for the issue of climate change and its impact. The Associated Press

Let me start by saying I am a staunch believer in climate change — mankind-accelerated, not caused.

I’m a person who has traveled the world to places of danger, abject poverty and with environmental challenges, and I believe I have a quality opinion about this subject.

For just a moment, let me pretend I am on the side of the climate change deniers and the planet isn’t out of step with the normal climate change that has occurred over the life of its existence.

If you lived in Los Angeles in the 1960s or currently live in Beijing; the Central Valley; Onitsha, Nigeria; New Delhi; or Zabol, Iran, you will have experienced some of the worst air pollution in the world. The most evident culprit is the burning of fossil fuels for transportation and electricity generation, oil and coal.

So, in our battle to decry the fraud of climate change, you may want to consider that embracing the alternative and green energy revolution will have collateral benefits of clean air and clean water; these are irrefutable consequences of the continued use of fossil fuels to empower the unmitigated “growth” every industrialized and emerging economy hopes to maintain or achieve.

David R. Robbins, San Luis Obispo

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